OTN APAC tour 2014 stop 1 – Perth, Australia

I arrived in Singapore a day before the conference and used this bit of quiet time to catch up on work stuff rather than do sightseeing. We had a nice ACE dinner downtown even though Tim did not make it in time. So it was Craig from the US and the local heroes (really, a very high density of excellent Oracle presenters and ACEs) Penny, Gavin, Connor and Scott. To me, one of the biggest benefites of the ACE program is getting to meet all these birght people and being able to call a lot of them great friends.

Connor took us to the beach for a quick swim on both days since – again – Tim did not make it on the first morning even though he said he was up and ready. The swell as a tad gnarly with pretty big waves on Friday. It was good fun and a refreshing way to start both days.

For me and the other speakers of the tour this was propably the hardest work at any one of the conferences since we all did two 2-hour ACE masterclasses each. But we started with an OpenWorld recap which had 7 of us talk about one aspect of OOW for 5 minutes each. This was inspired by the 12 on 12c presentation that EOUC did in San Francisco. This was good fun and I explained how you can have an excellent time and get good value out of the conference even without going to a single session. Others shared their own perspective on what to do or not and gave a summary of the hot topics at the conference.

All of my sessions went great and were very well attended. They made me feel like a real VIP during lunch when I got my own (vegetarian) meal with a big sign with my name. Since this was a local event for most attendees there was only a small networking thing with a few tame beers after the sessions and everybody went home at a decent time so after a quick dinner from the local convenience store this was another chance to get some decent rest.

Tim Hall handstandThe second day had the same strong content-rich agenda as the first day, mayben even more. Connor did a talk about 12c new features for developers. Initially we were afraid that this would clash with my presentation the day before (which was also 12c new features) but they complemented each other very well. He mentioned a lot of things that I did not even think about and also a lot of stuff around PL/SQL that I just barely ever get to play with. Penny Cookson did a brilliant session on how the optimizer works by comparing it to a girl trying to find a partner and working out the best plan all the while doing estimates based on statistics (as in how many single guys in the right age and height would be at any of Perth’s bars at a given time). It was hilarious and a great learning experience aswell. It is pretty scary to realize that an analogy like this works so well. I was still so impressed that I tried to work the analogy into my own presentation on baselines that I was doing after lunch. But it did not feel right to compare SPM to evaluating the quality of a new partner by trying out both the old and the new one. Or maybe that is an excellent analogy.

There were a few drinks and a dinner after the conference after which Tim and I went straight to the airport to catch the first of two flights to Shanghai at 2am – no point in going back to the hotel.

4 thoughts on “OTN APAC tour 2014 stop 1 – Perth, Australia

  1. Hi, Bjoern. Just a follow up on that comment I made about dbms_xplan.display_sql_plan_baseline() erring if it comes across a baseline generated for a dropped user – the work-around suggested (endorsed?) by Oracle via a SR was to update the SYS sqlobj$auxdata table’s Creator column to an equivalently privileged, existing, user (or schema object owner). I found that you had to use Parsing_schema_name column instead, but it worked – all data comes back. Cheers, Andrew

  2. Pingback: OTN APAC tour stop 2 – Shanghai, China | portrix systems

  3. Pingback: OTN APAC tour stop 4 – Beijing, China | portrix systems

  4. Pingback: OTN APAC tour blog posts compilation | portrix systems

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